Tg-Arc-Swe Atlas

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About

Transgenic mice carrying the Arctic (E693G) and Swedish (KM670/6701NL) amyloid-b precursor protein (AβPP) develop amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits in the brain that resemble Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology. The tg-ArcSwe atlas provides access to Aβx-40 immunolabeled histological section images from representative 12 month old tg-ArcSwe mice (Lord et al., Neurobiol. Aging 27:67-77, 2006), showing the morphology and spatial distribution of Aβx-40 plaque deposits across the brain.

Access image repository

The virtual microscopy viewer allows interactive zooming and panning. Original images are available for download via separate link.

Re-use of data from this repository is allowed provided that reference is given to the following publication: Lillehaug S, Syverstad GH, Nilsson LNG,Bjaalie JG, Leergaard TB, Torp R (2014): Brainwide distribution and variance of amyloid-beta deposits in tg-ArcSwe mice. Neurobiology of Aging, 35:556-564 (doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.09.013).

Case # Animal Image repository Download
F3 Female tg-ArcSwe, 12 months Filmstrip viewer (32 images) Tiffs
M3 Male tg-ArcSwe, 12 months Filmstrip viewer (17 images) Tiffs

Supporting material

Case # Animal Image repository Download
F2 Female tg-ArcSwe, 12 months Filmstrip viewer (4 images) Tiffs
M4 Male tg-ArcSwe, 12 months Filmstrip viewer (4 images) Tiffs

Experimental procedures in brief

  • Animals: mice carrying a human APP cDNA with the Arctic (p. E693G) and Swedish (p. KM670/671NL) mutations
  • Immunohistochemistry:
    • Sagittal sections from the right hemisphere were cryosectioned at 25 µm.
    • Amyloid deposits were identified using primary antibodies Aβx-40, visualized using streptavidin-biotinylated horseradish peroxidase comples and diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride
    • Digital images were created using a slidescanner (Mirax Scan, Carl Zeiss Microimaging, Jena, Germany)

For further details, see Lillehaug et al., Neurobiol Aging 35:556-564, 2013.

Contributing laboratories

Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences - Anatomy, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1105 Blindern, N - 0317 Oslo, Norway. Animal breeding, immunohistochemistry. People: Gry H. Syverstad, Reidun Torp

Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo & Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 1057 Blindern, N - 0316 Oslo, Norway. Animal breeding. People: Lars N.G. Nilsson

Neural Systems Laboratory (http://www.nesys.uio.no), Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience & Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Department of Anatomy, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1105 Blindern, N - 0317 Oslo, Norway: Image acquisition, Histochemistry, Atlas repository. People: Sveinung Lillehaug, Dmitri Darine, Gergely Csucs, Grazyna Babinska, Trygve B. Leergaard, Jan G. Bjaalie

Funded by:

  • The neuroinformatics components of this resource have been funded by the Human Brain Project through the European Union Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 604102 (HBP), and The Research Council of Norway (INCF National Node, project 218842).

Contact

j.g.bjaalie@medisin.uio.no